People at the NRB
Vani Pariyadath, Ph.D.
Vani Pariyadath, Ph.D.

Visiting Fellow | vani.pariyadath@nih.gov

Vani received her Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science in 2003, from the University of Pune, and a Master’s degree in Cognitive Science in 2005, from the University of Allahabad, both in India. She then flew halfway across the globe to Houston, Texas to begin doctoral work in Neuroscience. She completed her Ph.D. thesis, entitled “Toward understanding the neural mechanisms underlying subjective duration”, in 2010 under the supervision of Dr. David Eagleman at Baylor College of Medicine. Currently, Vani is working on a project assessing vulnerability to drug addiction using psychophysics and neuroimaging.

Research Interests:

  • Vulnerability to drug addiction
  • Time perception

Publications:

  • Sereno AB, Jeter CB, Pariyadath V and Briand KA (2006). Dissociating Sensory and Motor Components of Inhibition of Return. The Scientific World Journal, 6, 862–887.
  • Pariyadath V and Eagleman D (2007). The effect of predictability on subjective duration, PLoS One, 2(11): e1264.
  • Srinivasan N and Pariyadath V (2008). Dissecting the Frog: Computational Approaches to Humor Perception, Advances in Cognitive Science, Srinivasan, N, Gupta, AK, & Pandey J (Eds.). Sage Publications.
  • Pariyadath V and Eagleman DM (2008). Brief subjective durations are contracted by repetition in the absence of explicit temporal judgments, Journal of Vision, 8(16).
  • Srinivasan N and Pariyadath V (2009). ‘GraPHIA: A Computational Model for Identifying Phonological Jokes, Cognitive Processing, 10(1), 1-6.
  • Eagleman DM and Pariyadath V (2009). Is Subjective Duration a Signature of Coding Efficiency? Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (Biological Sciences), 364(1525), 1841-1851.
  • Pariyadath V and Eagleman DM (In press). Duration illusions and what they tell us about the brain”, Advances in Cognitive Science: Volume 2. Srinivasan N, Kar BR, & Pandey JP (Eds.). Sage Publications.
 
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